Lā 189: Uncle Ku was asked if he believed the U.S. had done something illegal to break the lease. He assumed like most leases that it would have some kind of provision that the tenant was subject to the laws of the state or county.

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During the break I chatted with the army attorneys who are sitting in the back row observing the whole trial. In regards to the weapons Uncle Ku observed and suggested are illegal weapons the army guys know that the lease that was drafted in the 1960s was so loosely written that they aren't restricted from using any weapons. Uncle Ku was asked if he believed the U.S. had done something illegal to break the lease. He assumed like most leases that it would have some kind of provision that the tenant was subject to the laws of the state or county. When asked to find it in the lease he took the challenge like a champ and said it may take a while but I'll read it. Anyway as the army knows the lease doesn't say anything about that. So back to the army attorney who says off the cuff if they are worried about DU (depleted uranium) the lease isn't the way to challenge it. Under this lease they can do anything. Chemical testing. They could test the atomic bomb. Well that's assuring. Let's just get into another million year lease for a $1 and let them do whatever the hell they want? Why not? FYI the army is threatening to condemn the land if they don't get the new lease they want. So there's that. Anyway, after lunch we got to watch the movie Pōhakuloa now that you know which is the movie that originally introduced me to this issue. I have begged most of my friends to watch or sat down and made them watch it. It's pretty powerful stuff and I wondered why the defense brought it up as an exhibit a as part of their cross examination of Ku Ching. When the lights came back on DA Moores point was that there was no criticism of the state's management in the video. He asked Ku if he thought DU was prohibited in the lease to which he replied like the cool cat he is 'it wasn't on the scene then (when the lease was written) the Pōhakuloa scene that is.' He was also asked what type of equipment would you expect a State employee to use if they were to inspect Pōhakuloa. 'For starters I'd expect they have good legs, and good eyes and the ability to write reports!' (A total jab at the blank report from 1994 the DLNR keeps trying to reference as a site visit. ‪#‎cartooncourtreport‬

Source Babes Against Biotech